Repertorio Español

Saturday Evening, February 10-11, 2017 at 7:30 pm

Meadows Museum at SMU

The Dallas Bach Society
James Richman, Artistic Director

Repertorio Español
Nell Snaidas, Soprano

Yo soy la Locura from Cinquisieme livre (1614)
Henri du Bailly (158?-1637)
Gabrielle Bataille (1575-1639)
(obbligato parts Grant C. Herreid)

Ciaccona
Andrea Falconieri (1585-1656)

Quien quiere entrar
El baxel
Bataille

Recercada Primera sobre tenore Italianos
Recercada Segunda sobre ‘La Spagna’
Recercada Segunda sobre tenore Italianos
Diego Ortiz (1510-1570)

Zarzuela ‘SALIR EL AMOR DEL MUNDO’ (1696)
Eso No Cobarde
Sosieguen, descansen
Sebastián Durón (1660-1716)

Folia
Falconieri

Ojos pues me desdeñáis
No sé yo cómo es
Niña como en tus mudanzas
José Marin(1619-1699)

Passacalles
Los Imposibles
Fandango
Santiago de Murcia
(1673-1739)

Passapieds viejo y nueba
Cumbes
Murcia

Codex Martínez Compañón/ Codex Trujillo del Perú  (1781)
Transcribed and arranged by Tom Zajac (1956-2014)
El Palomo
Lanchas Para Baylar

Oygan una Xácarilla
Rafael Castellanos (1725-1791)

Convidando está la noche
Juan García Zéspedes (1619-1778)

About the Artist: 

Grammy-nominated soprano Nell Snaidas has been praised by the New York Times for her “vocally ravishing” performances and “melting passion”. Her voice has also been described as “remarkably pure with glints of rich sensuality” (Vancouver Sun) as well as “powerfully at home in the works of Monteverdi” (San Francisco Classical Voice). Of Uruguayan-American descent, Nell is recognized for her specialization in historical performance practice, in particular the repertoire of Italy, Latin America and Spain. Nell began her career singing leading roles in zarzuelas at New York City’s Repertorio Español and has sung in venues ranging from the Hollywood Bowl to Tanglewood, from Teatro Massimo (Palermo) to the missions of Bolivia. Favorite projects include singing with Los Angeles Philharmonic at Disney Hall, recording the movie-soundtrack of “The Producers” with Mel Brooks in the booth, singing Schubert Lieder with duet partner Daniel Swenberg on 19th century guitar and collaborating with Alicia Keys on the musical arrangement and Italian translation of her song “Superwoman” for Kathleen Battle for the grand finale of the 2008 America Music Awards. Upcoming performances include a return to the Boston Early Music Festival to portay the role of Amore in both L’Incoronazione di Poppea and Il Ritorno di Ulisse both by Claudio Monteverdi.

Renowned as an interpreter of Iberian Early music, Nell has been invited to coach and select repertoire for many leading Early Music Ensembles including The Trinity Wall Street Choir, Piffaro and The Rose Ensemble as well as serve on the faculty of the New York Continuo Collective and at the Madison Early Music Festival, where she will return this summer to make her directorial debut of the baroque zarzuela “La Púrpura de la Rosa”.

Nell has was featured on CBC radio as one of the leading interpreters of Spanish Renaissance/Sephardic song and has recorded for Sony Classical, Sono Luminus, Koch International and Dorian. Recent projects include collaborations as soloist/co-director with: Apollo’s Fire: The Cleveland Baroque Orchestra in “Sephardic Journey” (which debuted at #5 on the Classical Billboard chart), The Bishops’s Band “Codex Trujillo del Perú” with Tom Zajac (Trinity Wall St. 12th Night Festival) Bach Collegium San Diego’s program of music from 18th century Latin America. Nell is the co-artistic director of GEMAS, a concert series in NYC devoted to the early music and musicians of the Americas and sponsored by Americas Society and GEMS. www.nellsnaidas.com Nell is thrilled to reunite with James Richman and the Dallas Bach Society for this concert of music that is so close to her heart.

Handel’s Messiah at the Meyerson

Monday, 19 December 2016 at 7:30 pm – Meyerson Symphony Center

THE DALLAS BACH SOCIETY

James Richman, Artistic Director

Messiah
A Sacred Oratorio

by George Frideric Handel

Words selected from Holy Scripture by Charles Jennens

Ava Pine, Soprano
Kathryne Overturf, Alto
Derek Chester, Tenor
David Grogan, Bass

The oratorio is composed in “scenes” which connect and separate the different quotations from scripture.

 

 

About the Program:

Handel’s Messiah is called “A Grand Musical Entertainment” in the catalogue of the Charitable Musical Society of Dublin, where it is the most treasured entry, despite Handel’s description of it on the cover page of his manuscript as “An Oratorio.”  The first performance was given in the city of Dublin on April 13, 1742, although the work was written in London in August/September of 1741. Charles Jennens, who provided the words, wrote a friend (on 10 July, 1741) “Handel says he will do nothing next winter, but I hope I shall perswade him to set another Scripture Collection I have made for him, & perform it for his own Benefit in Passion Week. I hope he will lay out his whole Genius & Skill upon it, that the Composition may excell all his former Compositions, as the subject excells every other subject. The Subject is Messiah.” Handel must have indeed been inspired, as he seems to have composed Messiah in white heat directly upon receiving Jennens’s “Collection” – what is interesting is why he made no immediate plans for performance. Perhaps the idea that Handel gave the premiere in Dublin because he feared the reaction of the more stringent Protestant clergy of London may have some truth to it, but before long the work was beloved there and was given many a performance, including annual benefits for the Foundling Hospital, Handel’s favorite charity.  On the 25th anniversary of Handel’s death, in 1784, a grand Handel festival was organized in Westminster Abbey, which featured a total of 275 choristers and an orchestra of 250 players. The numerical notion of greatness only gathered momentum during the nineteenth century, leading up to an 1859 performance at the Crystal Palace under the baton of Sir Michael Costa which featured a total of 3,225 musicians.  At this point a music critic by the name of George Bernard Shaw (writing under the pen name Corno di Bassetto) raised the salient point in response to the ever more gargantuan presentations of the work.  “Why doesn’t somebody set up a thoroughly rehearsed and exhaustively studied performance of Messiah in St. James’s Hall with a chorus of twenty capable artists?  Most of us would be glad to hear the work seriously performed once before we die.”

Informed by the “historically-informed performance movement,” this goal is now a reality, which is as it should be, for this was the greatest of men and of composers, whose facility and genius have rarely if ever been equaled.  The full extent of his work, in the shadows until the last few decades, has now begun to be enjoyed, once again mostly because of the “movement.” Nowadays Handel is indeed known for more than Messiah and a few other oratorios and instrumental pieces, and the true extent of his universality is more and better felt in our time.

The thumbnail biography by Sir Charles Beecham, written for a post card of Handel’s portrait at the National Gallery, gives the idea most succinctly:

George Frederick Handel (1685-1759).  Born in Halle and died in London, a naturalized Englishman.  Greatest of the international composers, he wrote with equal success in the styles of France, Germany, Italy and England.  His career, like his personality, was stormy and brilliant.  The downfall of Italian opera led him to English oratorio and his masterpiece, Messiah.  He loved pictures, and children, endowing liberally the Foundling Hospital.  Afflicted with paralyses and blindness, he died wealthy and the idol of the nation.  Buried in Westminster Abbey.

The connection of Handel’s oratorios with his operatic style is obvious, for while he did indeed change his focus after “the downfall of Italian opera” in London, he never abandoned the dramatic sense that informed his operas, particularly the later ones where the seemingly endless stream of da capo arias gives way to greater variety in composition.

The structure of Messiah is quite operatic, and much of the work is easy to imagine staged. Handel begins with a most unusual overture, in the unheard of (for overtures) key of E minor, characterized in the various lists of affects at the time as a key of uncertainty and gloom, with relief possible but not obvious. Of course this is a drama where the story is known to everyone in advance, which leads to a different order of events than any opera would have, and indeed we find that the uncertainty in the overture is immediately dispelled with a tenor recitative in the key of E major, at once a special and brilliant tonality, on the words “Comfort ye, my people” from the Book of Isaiah.

As “librettist,” Jennens pieces together verses from scripture which provide connection and movement not only from one aria or chorus to the next, but also in the grand scheme of the composition where the large divisions (corresponding to operatic acts) are united by theme and also provided with division into “scenes” by the connection and separation of Biblical quotations. The first “scene” in Part the First (Act One) thus consists of the recitative and aria for tenor and the first chorus, set to consecutive verses from Isaiah. The second “scene” is from Malachi, consisting of the stormy bass recitative Thus saith the Lord, followed by the aria But Who May Abide the Day of his Coming and the chorus And He Shall Purify the Sons of Levi.  The third of these scenes is a pastiche of Isaiah vii, xl, and ix, ending with the proclamation of the birth of the Messiah. Then there is a brief instrumental interlude (pifa) which introduces the pastoral theme for the second part of “Act One” where the arrival of the newborn Jesus is portrayed in a scene which is easily imagined on stage – a soprano soloist appears along with angels placed in cloud machines while shepherds sing “And peace on Earth” standing around the crèche on ground level. At the end of this miniature drama, the angel chorus Glory to God ends with the disappearance of the staged angels as the orchestra evanesces into nothingness. Only the soprano soloist remains, to sing Rejoice Greatly (Book of Zachariah), joined then by the Alto for He Shall Feed his Flock, leading to the choral Finale His Yoke is Easy. By this time the tonal center has shifted to Bb Major for the close of the “Act”, which is as far away from the opening key of E Minor as is possible in Western music.

These final pieces introduce another characteristic of Jennens’s genius, which is the juxtaposition of the promise of the Messiah found in the Old Testament with the actual arrival of the Messiah in the New. Here this is illustrated with verses from Isaiah xxxv and Matthew xi. It is more than a little astonishing that well over half the text for Messiah is in fact from the Old Testament! The most stunning use of this device will come in Part the Third in the chorus Since by Man Came Death, where alternating sections of slow, dark, a capella singing from Old Testament texts alternate with brilliant choral sections with orchestra on the subject of the Messiah’s appearance from the New, just as the Old Testament figures usually found on the gloomy north sides of the eastward-facing great cathedrals contrast with the sunny brilliance of the New Testament windows and sculpture found on the southern walls.

That there was probably no intermission per se after Part the First is indicated by the progression from Bb to G minor at the beginning of Part the Second, and then to Eb for the great aria He was despised. (There is a symmetry with Part the Third if one considers Parts One and Two together, as both start in E and conclude in D.) In any event, Part the Second is divided similarly to Part the First into two great sections – the first telling the story of the human suffering of Christ, interestingly set to words entirely from the Old Testament after the brief operatic entry music (not an overture) Behold the Lamb of God from Saint John, and the second celebrating His divine aspect suffusing the world and causing torment to the wicked with a virtual crescendo of glorious righteousness: Why do the Nations so Furiously Rage Together?, Let us Break Their Bonds Asunder, He That Dwelleth in Heaven Shall Laugh Them to Scorn, Thou Shalt Break Them Like a Potter’s Vessel, Hallelujah!

Part the Third, the shortest, deals with the End of Days and the Last Trumpet, again combining the Messiah’s assurance of everlasting life (I Know that my Redeemer Liveth, once again in the magical key of E Major) with the promise of death overcome (The Trumpet Shall Sound and Death, Where is Thy Sting). The great finale Worthy is the Lamb that was Slain contains a majestic Amen for which we find numerous counterpoint studies in Handel’s notebooks, and which carries us majestically upwards as if in a great Baroque cathedral with a high oval of sky or paradise surrounded by swirling angels. And yet, at the very moment of triumph at the end of this signal composition, there is a surprising grand pause on an inverted dominant seventh chord begging for resolution, which seems to stop everything for supernatural reasons, exactly as when the fantastic forward energy of the Hallelujah Chorus comes to a crashing halt just before the end, at the height of its rapture. The Rev. Bishop Mark Herbener of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America points out to us that these two movements are the only pieces in Messiah with texts from the apocalyptic Book of Revelation, where indeed just before the end of the world there comes a great silence of half an hour. It appears that George Frederic Handel knew his Bible, and responded to it, on a very high level!

About the Artists: 

Soprano Ava Pine, a native of Texas, continues to dazzle audiences and critics with her rewarding vocalism and compelling commitment to character, creating vivid and captivating portraits on stage.  Equally at home with opera, oratorio or recital, and accomplished in works ranging from baroque to contemporary, she brings great vocal and dramatic range to her work, as Opera News writes: “Ava Pine…all but stole the show.  By turns seductive, determined, wounded and moved, she sailed sweetly through a vast range of pitches.” The 2015-2016 season included debuts with Chicago Opera Theatre as Lucio Cinna in Lucio Silla, Opera Memphis as Pamina in The Magic Flute, her return to the Dallas Symphony for their Christmas Pops Concert, The Young Girl in After Life with UrbanArias, and Krysia in Jake Heggie’s Out of Darkness with Music of Remembrance.

The 2016-2017 season includes Anna Sørenson in Silent Night with Atlanta Opera and a return to Fort Worth Opera for their Gala Concert. The 2014-2015 season for Ms. Pine included a Messiah with the Dallas Bach Society, a concert with Performance Santa Fe Orchestra, Despina in Florida Grand Opera’s Così fan tutte, a return to Tulsa Opera as Curley’s Wife in Of Mice and Men, and concerts with the Fort Worth Symphony and Bard. During the 2013-2014 season, Ava returned to Florentine Opera as Cleopatra in Giulio Cesare, to Fort Worth Opera as Anna Sørensen in Puts’ Silent Night, and debuted with Kentucky Opera as Gounod’s Juliette and Tulsa Opera as Susanna in Le nozze di Figaro. On the concert stage, she joined the San Luis Obispo Symphony for Golijov’s Three Songs for Soprano and Orchestra, and returned to the Dallas Symphony Orchestra for their annual Christmas Celebration and Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra for Mendelssohn’s Elijah. Recent seasons have included performances of Susanna in Le nozze di Figaro with Opera Colorado and Wichita Grand Opera, Juliette in Roméo et Juliette with Opera Colorado, Marie in The Daughter of Regiment with Fort Worth Opera, Pamina in Die Zauberflöte with Dallas Opera, Michigan Opera Theater, and Florentine Opera, Lysia in Adamo’s Lysistrata with Fort Worth Opera, Blanca in the world premiere of Davis’s Rio de Sangre with Florentine Opera, Cleopatra in Giulio Cesare with Fort Worth Opera, Adina in L’elisir d’amore with the Arizona Opera and the Fort Worth Opera, Norina in Don Pasquale with Opera New Jersey, Josephine for Lyric Opera of Kansas City’s H.M.S. Pinafore, and Serpina in La serva padrona with the Vestfold Festspillene festival in Norway.

Ms. Pine made her European debut with the BBC Symphony Orchestra as The Angel in the United Kingdom premiere of Angels in America, a role she first debuted with Fort Worth Opera. She spent two seasons with the Dallas Opera as the company’s first young artist in residence, and enjoys a strong relationship with the company, performing Juliette in matinees of Roméo et Juliette, Adele in Die Fledermaus, Elvira in L’italiana in Algeri, Lady in Waiting in Macbeth, Zozo in The Merry Widow, and Yvette in La rondine.

Kathryne Overturf, mezzo-soprano, became a founding company member of Praeclara and was seen in the 2015-2016 season as the alto soloist for Handel’s Messiah Parts II and III as well as premiering the role of Ekaterina in a new work of Dracula. She was seen as Hänsel in University of Central Arkansas’s production of Hänsel und Gretel as well as engaged with Opera in the Rock’s outreach, “Once Upon an Opera.”

In the 2014-2015 season Ms. Overturf made role debuts as Dido in Dido and Aeneas with Praeclara, Cherubino in Le nozze di Figaro with University of Central Arkansas and Sesto in Giulio Cesare in Egitto with Hawaii Performing Arts Festival. She has appeared with Oklahoma Opera and Music Theater Company as Mrs. Soames in Ned Rorem’s Our Town and Nicklausse and Le Muse in Les Contes d’Hoffmann. Her other role credits include Rosine (Signor Deluso) and Ma Moss (The Tender Land).

Ms. Overturf received a Master’s in Music from University of Central Arkansas, a Bachelor in Musical Arts from Oklahoma Baptist University, receiving the prestigious Warren M. Angell Scholarship, and received additional training at Oklahoma City University and the Taos Opera Institute.

Praised by the New York Times for his “beautifully shaped and carefully nuanced singing,” tenor Derek Chester is steadily making a name for himself in the world of classical music. Recent concert appearances include the title role in Handel’s Jephtha (Ars Lyrica Houston), Haydn’s Creation (Fort Worth Symphony), Monteverdi’s Vespers of 1610 (Boston Baroque); Beethoven’s Missa Solemnis (Berkshire Choral Festival); Britten’s War Requiem (Korean Broadcasting System Symphony Orchestra); Mendelssohn’s Symphony No.2 (Buffalo Philharmonic); Handel’s Messiah (Colorado Symphony Orchestra); Handel’s Theodora (Bach Collegium San Diego), and all of the major works of Bach with American Bach Soloists. Derek holds his Bachelor’s in Voice from University of Georgia and this Master’s in Early Music from the Yale School of Music as a full scholarship recipient.

As a Fulbright Scholar, he spent a year in Germany working as a freelance musician and furthering his training with acclaimed German tenor Christoph Prégardien. Chester received his Doctorate in Voice and Opera Studies from the University of North Texas as a doctoral teaching fellow.  As a well-regarded pedagogue Chester was invited to participate in the 2016 NATS Intern Program and has given master classes at the San Francisco Conservatory, Colorado Mesa University, Western Michigan University, the American Bach Soloists Academy, the University of Georgia, and at the 2015 Colorado Wyoming Regional NATS auditions.  Dr. Chester currently serves on the voice faculty at the University of Northern Colorado and continues his worldwide career as an interpreter of concert and operatic repertoire.

David Grogan, bass, has performed extensively throughout the southwest, having appeared as a soloist with Dallas-Fort Worth area arts groups such as the Fort Worth Symphony, Dallas Bach Society, Plano Civic Chorus, Denton Bach Society, Texas Baroque Ensemble, Orpheus Chamber Singers, Texas Camerata, Fort Worth Baroque Society, and several Texas universities. Recent performances include the Handel’s Messiah with Saint Thomas Choir of Men and Boys in NYC, Handel’s Acis and Galatea with Mountainside Baroque in Maryland, and Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony at Bass Hall in Fort Worth, TX.

The Dallas Morning News hailed Dr. Grogan as the “perfect Christus” after a performance of the Saint Matthew Passion with the Dallas Bach Society. The Albuquerque Tribune, in reference to a performance of Messiah with the New Mexico Symphony, said, “David Grogan had all the range and power required of the part, sounding like the voice of doom in “The people that walked in darkness” and the light of revelation in “The trumpet shall sound.” A performance of Elijah had critics praising his ability to “move easily from stentorian declamation to lyrical aria.” Another critic said that he “….brought an impressive vocal power to the lead role of Elijah, and his rich emotive gift set the level for the other chief performers.” The Dallas Morning News said “His meaty bass shook the heavens and the earth and sounded the trumpet with imposing conviction.”

Dallas Bach Choir:

 

About the Dallas Bach Society and James Richman:

Since its founding in 1982 the Dallas Bach Society has been the primary resource in the Southwest for Baroque and Classic music on original instruments. Under the musical direction of James Richman, the Society unites the finest vocalists and instrumentalists fromthe Metroplex, all over the United States, and from abroad, in lively and informed performances of Bach, Handel, Vivaldi, Purcell, Monteverdi, Couperin, Schütz and other period composers. Every season the Dallas Bach Society presents a full program of Baroque and Classic music on original instruments, featuring performances of favorites like Handel’s Messiah, Bach’s Passions,  Cantatas and Brandenburg Concertos, Vivaldi’s Four Seasons, as well as little known works of great music which would otherwise be heard only rarely, if at all. Significant recent performances include staged presentations of Monteverdi’s Ballo delle Ingrate and Combattimento di Tancredi e Clorinda and the modern staged premiere of Jean-Philippe Rameau’s Zéphyre, both with the New York Baroque Dance Company; the Dublin and Mozart versions of Handel’s Messiah, Bach’s Saint John Passion and Saint Matthew Passion, French cantatas with Bernard Deletré and Ann Monoyios from the Paris Opera, CPE Bach’s Concerto for Harpsichord and Fortepiano with fortepianist Christoph Hammer, and recordings for CD of Messiah and Bach solo Cantatas. Our performance of Messiah was chosen for broadcast nationwide by Public Radio International in 2012. The Board of Directors has defined the mission of the Dallas Bach Society as follows: to present in public performances of the highest quality music composed before 1800, especially the works of Johann Sebastian Bach, to encourage the development of this musical repertoire in the Dallas area for both performers and audience, and to promote and encourage public education and awareness, understanding, and appreciation of the musical art of the Baroque and earlier periods in our own time. Funding for the DBS includes grants from the City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs, Texas Commission of the Arts, the Dallas Foundation, TACA, and private donations.  The DBS is a member of the Association of Professional Vocal Ensembles, the Neue Bach Gesellschaft, and is a founding member of Early Music America.

James Richman, Artistic Director of the Dallas Bach Society, is a prominent harpsichordist and fortepianist, as well as one of today’s leading conductors of Baroque music and opera. The first musician since Leonard Bernstein to graduate Harvard, Juilliard, and the Curtis Institute of Music, James Richman studied conducting with Max Rudolf and Herbert Blomstedt, piano with Rosina Lhevinne and Mieczyslaw Horszowski, and harpsichord with Albert Fuller and Kenneth Gilbert.  He holds a degree in the History of Science magna cum laude from Harvard College.  A recipient of the prestigious United States-France Exchange Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, he was made a chevalier in the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French government in 1995, in recognition of his contributions to the field of music. James Richman has been a prizewinner in four international competitions for early keyboard instruments, including first prize in the Bodky Competition of the Cambridge Society of Early Music, laureate of the Bruges Harpsichord Competition and bronze medal in the Paris Harpsichord Competition of the Festival Estival and in the First International Fortepiano Competition (Paris).  In appearances at the Mostly Mozart Festival, the Spoleto Festival USA, the E. Nakamichi Baroque Festival, the Boston Early Music Festival, as well as in regular series in New York, he has organized and conducted revivals of stage works by Handel, Gluck, Purcell, J.C. Bach, Monteverdi, and seven operas of Jean-Philippe Rameau. He has recorded for Nonesuch, Newport Classic, Centaur, Vox and New World records, and his live performance of Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto #6 is featured on National Public Radio’s Bach CD, along with recordings of James Galway, Yo-Yo Ma and Christopher Hogwood.  He is also Artistic Director of New York’s Concert Royal ensemble, which appears annually with the Choir of Men and Boys at Saint Thomas Church on Fifth Avenue in the performances of Messiah and the great works of Bach and Purcell.

Symphonies of Josef Haydn on 3 December 2016

Saturday Evening, December 3, 2016 at 7:30 pm – Church of the Incarnation

THE DALLAS BACH SOCIETY | James Richman, Artistic Director

SYMPHONIES OF JOSEF HAYDN

Symphony #6 in D Major “Le Matin”
Symphony #7 in C Major “Le Midi”
Symphony # 8 in G Major “Le Soir”

About the Program:

Joseph Haydn was of course one of the most important composers of the Classical era, and was known as the “Father of the Symphony”, having composed 104 of them! The set given this evening was the first group he wrote in his new position as Vice-Kapellmeister to Prince Paul Anton (Pál Antal) of Esterházy, in the year 1761. He was already 29 years old, and the times were changing as the Baroque era had run its course with the fashion for a simpler and more “Classic” style becoming predominant. While these symphonies owe a great deal to the Baroque concerto grosso format in a certain sense, what is different is the emphasis on solo instruments as opposed to pairs of instruments.

The large amount of solo writing in these works could just as well be thought of as an hommage by Haydn to the excellent players hired by Prince Paul Anton at the same time he was engaged by the Esterházy family. The Prince’s grandfather had been a poet, harpsichordist and composer, as well as a military leader who helped raise the siege of Vienna in 1683. Paul Anton was himself also a very musical man, playing the violin, flute, and lute, as well as being an important collector of manuscripts. With Haydn and the newly enhanced orchestra he had instantly made Esterházy an important venue, but alas he would not enjoy it for long as he himself died in 1762. Luckily for Haydn and the musical establishent (he would become Kapellmeister himself upon the death of the aged Gregor Werner) the new Prince Nikolaus (Miklos) the Magnificent also loved music and kept Haydn and the musical establishment for the rest of his life (until 1790).

Haydn’s early years were marked by trying apprenticeships and boy-choir placements, including at St. Stephen’s Cathedral in Vienna, which nonetheless often left him literally hungry. He soon learned to crave free-lance singing where refreshments were often served by the hosts! When his voice changed at the age of 17 and he was no longer suitable for church singing he was forced to find his own way, but he was able to survive as a music teacher, street musician, and when he was 20, as the valet-accompanist to the important Italian composer Nicola Porpora, whom he later credited with teaching him the basics of composition. He also studied the Gradus ad Parnassum of Fux, and the works of Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach for inspiration. He wrote his first opera at the age of 21, free-lanced for the palace in Vienna, and at the houses of Countess Thun and Baron Fürnberg, and finally got full-time employment with Count Morzin, in what is now the Czech Republic.

When the latter fell upon hard times and disbanded his orchestra, Haydn was picked up in 1761 by Prince Paul Anton and became a fixture at Esterházy for three decades. In a way it was lucky that in 1790 he was more or less let go by the new Prince Anton as the musical life of the castle was curtailed. Haydn was free to travel freely, as he had long realized the irony that even though he was the most famous composer in Europe, he was yet a duty-bound Kapellmeister in the remote Hungarian countryside. Haydn was fortunate to live long enough to be the toast of London and Paris, the mentor of Mozart and teacher of Beethoven! His first set of symphonies, fresh, lively and inventive, provide a lovely window into the world of his youth, and his own optimistic, lively, and endearing compositional style.

 


Since its founding in 1982 the Dallas Bach Society has been the primary resource in the Southwest for Baroque and Classic music on original instruments. Under the musical direction of James Richman, the Society unites the finest vocalists and instrumentalists from the Metroplex, all over the United States, and from abroad, in lively and informed performances of Bach, Handel, Vivaldi, Purcell, Monteverdi, Couperin, Schütz and other period composers. Every season the Dallas Bach Society presents a full program of Baroque and Classic music on original instruments, featuring performances of favorites like Handel’s Messiah, Bach’s Passions,  Cantatas and Brandenburg Concertos, Vivaldi’s Four Seasons, as well as little known works of great music which would otherwise be heard only rarely, if at all. Significant recent performances include staged presentations of Monteverdi’s Ballo delle Ingrate and Combattimento di Tancredi e Clorinda and the modern staged premiere of Jean-Philippe Rameau’s Zéphyre, both with the New York Baroque Dance Company; the Dublin and Mozart versions of Handel’s Messiah, Bach’s Saint John Passion and Saint Matthew Passion, French cantatas with Bernard Deletré and Ann Monoyios from the Paris Opera, CPE Bach’s Concerto for Harpsichord and Fortepiano with fortepianist Christoph Hammer, and recordings for CD of Messiah and Bach solo Cantatas. Our performance of Messiah was chosen for broadcast nationwide by Public Radio International in 2012. The Board of Directors has defined the mission of the Dallas Bach Society as follows: to present in public performances of the highest quality music composed before 1800, especially the works of Johann Sebastian Bach, to encourage the development of this musical repertoire in the Dallas area for both performers and audience, and to promote and encourage public education and awareness, understanding, and appreciation of the musical art of the Baroque and earlier periods in our own time. Funding for the DBS includes grants from the City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs, Texas Commission of the Arts, the Dallas Foundation, TACA, and private donations.  The DBS is a member of the Association of Professional Vocal Ensembles, the Neue Bach Gesellschaft, and is a founding member of Early Music America.

James Richman, Artistic Director of the Dallas Bach Society, is a prominent harpsichordist and fortepianist, as well as one of today’s leading conductors of Baroque music and opera. The first musician since Leonard Bernstein to graduate Harvard, Juilliard, and the Curtis Institute of Music, James Richman studied conducting with Max Rudolf and Herbert Blomstedt, piano with Rosina Lhevinne and Mieczyslaw Horszowski, and harpsichord with Albert Fuller and Kenneth Gilbert.  He holds a degree in the History of Science magna cum laude from Harvard College.  A recipient of the prestigious United States-FranceExchange Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, he was made a chevalier in the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French government in 1995, in recognition of his contributions to the field of music. James Richman has been a prizewinner in four international competitions for early keyboard instruments, including first prize in the Bodky Competition of the Cambridge Society of Early Music, laureate of the Bruges Harpsichord Competition, and bronze medal in the Paris Harpsichord Competition of the Festival Estival and in the First International Fortepiano Competition (Paris). In appearances at the Mostly Mozart Festival, the Spoleto Festival USA, the E. Nakamichi Baroque Festival, the Boston Early Music Festival, as well as in regular series in New York, he has organized and conducted revivals of stage works by Handel, Gluck, Purcell, J.C. Bach, Monteverdi, and seven operas of Jean-Philippe Rameau. He has recorded for Nonesuch, Newport Classic, Centaur, Vox and New World records, and his live performance of Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto #6 is featured on National Public Radio’s Bach CD, along with recordings of James Galway, Yo-Yo Ma and Christopher Hogwood.  He is also Artistic Director of New York’s Concert Royal ensemble, which appears annually with the Choir of Men & Boys at St. Thomas Church on 5th Avenue in performances of Messiah and the great works of Bach & Purcell.

James Andrewes performs with many North American period instrument ensembles including the Dallas Bach Society, Indianapolis Baroque Orchestra, Bach Society Houston, Ars Lyrica Houston, and the Orchestra of New Spain. As a member of the early music group ¡Sacabuche! he has performed in China and Macau as well as throughout the U.S. and Canada, and can be heard on its recent recording of 17th Century Italian Motets on the ATMA Classique label (2015). He has directed and performed in several cantatas for the ongoing Bloomington Bach Cantata Series in Bloomington, Indiana.

James grew up in Dunedin, New Zealand, where he began violin lessons at the age of five. He attained a Bachelor of Music (University of Otago), Master of Music (University of Oregon), and a Post-Masters Certificate in String Quartet Performance (University of Colorado) under the mentorship of the Takács Quartet. In 2011 he graduated with a second Masters degree at Indiana University, where he studied Early Music and Baroque violin with Stanley Ritchie. As a student he attended various festivals and workshops including the Aspen Music Festival and School, the Australian Festival of Chamber Music, the Juilliard String Quartet Seminar and the San Francisco Early Music Society summer workshops. In 2010 he was one of a select group of young musicians invited to participate in a national tour of New Zealand as part of the Wallfisch Band directed by baroque violinist Elizabeth Wallfisch.

Dallas Bach Orchestra:

James Andrewes, Concertmster

Marie-Elise MacNeely, Principal Second Violin

Thane Isaac, Michelle Hanlon, Helen Shore, Sarah Marshall, Violins

Miguel Cantu, Viola

Eric Smith, Cello

Randy Inman, Bass

Tamara Meredith, Janelle West, Flauto traverso

Mariana Riva, Sung Lee, Classical Oboe

Stephanie Corwin, Classical Bassoon

James Hampson, Burke Anderson, Natural Horn

Eric Smith performs Part I of Bach’s complete Cello Suites on 11-12 November

11-12 November

Johann Sebastian Bach
Suite No. 1 in G Major, BWV 1007

Prelude
Allemande
Courante
Sarabande
Minuet I & II
Gigue

Suite No. 3 in C Major, BWV 1009
Prelude
Allemande
Courante
Sarabande
Bourrée I & II
Gigue

Suite No. 5 in C Minor, BWV 1011
Prelude
Allemande
Courante
Sarabande
Gavotte I & II
Gigue

About the Artist:  

Praised by critics for his “flawless lightness and grace”, cellist Eric Smith has been called “the very model of an elegant cellist” (Dallas Morning News).  Eric has made himself known throughout the U.S. and abroad as a multi-faceted musician performing styles from early music on period instruments, to contemporary music.  As a soloist, chamber musician, and continuo player, Eric collaborates with ensembles including the Dallas Bach Society, Orchestra of New Spain, Texas Camerata, Ars Lyrica Houston, Sonare, Ensemble VIII, Denton Bach Society, Dallas Chamber Players, Bach Society of Houston, Mountainside Baroque, New York’s Concert Royal, and the New York Baroque Dance Company, in addition to many others.

Eric has appeared as a guest artist and recitalist at festivals including the Boston Early Music Festival, Hawaii Performing Arts Festival, Crested Butte Music Festival, Misiones de Chiquitos Festival (Bolivia), Cervantino Festival (Mexico), Les Nuits Baroques (France), and was artist-in-residence for two seasons at the Strings in the Mountains Music Festival in Colorado, as cellist of the Amir Quartet.  In addition to concertizing with Quartet Galant, a period instrument string quartet, Eric has performed chamber music with such notable artists as violinist Andres Cardenes, violist Yizhak Schotten, the Miami String Quartet, as well as principal players of the New York Philharmonic, and the Pittsburgh and Detroit Symphonies. His recordings have been heard on both NPR’s Performance Today, and Public Radio International, and he was featured in an interview in the 125th Anniversary issue of The Strad magazine.

Eric, an avid educator, is a frequent clinician and teacher throughout Texas, presenting master classes and clinics on modern and historical cellos, early music, chamber music, and viola da gamba.  He is on the faculty of the Bass and Cello Conservatory of Dallas, Dallas ISD Summer String Camp, and the Dallas Symphony Young Strings, as well as serving as Director of Education and Outreach for the Dallas Bach Society.  He has been a guest recitalist and clinician at the University of North Texas, University of Texas at Austin, University of Texas at Arlington, Texas Women’s University, and the Hawaii Performing Arts Festival.

Eric attended the University of North Texas studying cello under the tutelage of Eugene Osadchy and early music with lutenist Lyle Nordstrom, where he was honored as a Winspear scholar.  Eric also attended the International Baroque Institute at the Longy School of Music in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where he studied baroque cello with Phoebe Carrai.  Eric performs on a rare instrument made in 1751 by Leonhardt Maussiell of Nuremberg, Germany.

DBS 2016-17 Season Opens Saturday

Les Arts Florissants opens our 2016-17 season this Saturday! Please join us at 7:30 at Caruth Auditorium on the SMU campus.

If you’re unable to attend in person, donate $25 or more to show your support of early music in the Metroplex. dallasbach.org/membership

Thanks for your support!

Les Arts Florissant Program

LES ARTS FLORISSANTS

Saturday Evening, October 8, 2016, 7:30 p.m. at Caruth Auditorium, SMU

The Dallas Bach Society James Richman, Artistic Director

Clare Cason, Michelle Hanlon, Baroque Violins
Tamara Meredith, Janelle West, Baroque Flutes
Eric Smith, Viola da Gamba
Chrisopher Phillpott, Baroque Cello
James Richman, Harpsichord

with THE NEW YORK BAROQUE DANCE COMPANY

Catherine Turocy, Artistic Director – Carly Fox Horton, Glenda Norcross, Alexis Silver, Catherine Turocy, Brynt Beitman, Brock Henderson, Gabriel Speiller, Andrew Trego

and

Anna Frederica Popova, Camille Ortiz-Lafont, Rebecca Beasley, Sopranos
Katrina Burggraf-Kledas, Mezzo-Soprano
Nicholas Garza, Tenor
Patrick Gnage, Baritone
Joshua Hughes, Andrew Dittman, Bass


The creation of this production of Les Arts Florissants was made possible by generous grants from TACA, the Texas Commision for the Arts, the Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs, and numerous private donors. We are also grateful to Bruce Wood Dance Project and Contemporary Ballet Dallas for their support.

When he composed Les Arts Florissants, Marc Antoine Charpentier was in the service of the Duchesse de Guise, where he enjoyed the presence of a small but exquisite ensemble of musicians, several of whom were also servants. He produced a prodigious amount of music in all genres, which has the delightful characteristic that every “new” piece discovered and performed in our day proves to be of very high quality!

Les Arts Florissants, his Idyle en musique, was written in 1685 as best as can be judged, and thus during the lifetime of Lully, who held the Royal Patent for opera. Simply put, this Patent meant that no one else in the kingdom was allowed to use more than eight singers and eight musicians for dramatic musical works. While Charpentier did live long enough to survive this prohibition and write one full-blown opera, the cleverness with which he overcame the legal limitations in the current work is perhaps even a greater proof of his genius. He constructs a vocal ensemble of seven (in five parts with doubling of the soprano and bass parts) who serve as the solo Arts, as well as the chorus of Arts and Warriors. With the proper preparation, they also flee the stage, only to reappear as the followers of Discord. When Discord is vanquished by Peace (the eighth vocalist), they come back in their original guise to honor the return of Peace and the Flourishing Arts, in a finale of celestial beauty and perfection.

The exact reference to a real Peace has been much debated, as Louis XIV, whose Peace is clearly in question, was involved in a number of foreign conflicts at this time. One possibility that has not been much spoken of, but which may be the most important of all, is the turning of the tide in the ongoing war with the Turks, including the siege of Esztergom and the important victory at Novy Sad, as well as the turning back of the Turkish forces at the Gates of Vienna in 1683. This marked the beginning of the end of these conflicts, and Louis’s involvement in the victory was duly acknowledged by the Sublime Porte when he was ceded the title of protector of the Christian holy places in Palestine. Whatever the actual peace, however, Charpentier’s sublime work celebrates the bounty of peace on a higher level, with real gratitude for the blessings peace brings, especially for the arts.

Charpentier’s Sonata, a rare instrumental work, seems related to Les Arts Florissants by its position in the manuscript volumes containing his compositions. It stands alone as a work of great inventiveness, but is even more interesting in this context. His delightful Song of the birth of Jesus dates from the same period and was written for the same musicians and singers.

On Baroque Dance:

Although the forerunner of ballet, Baroque dance has its own vocabulary of movements and expressivity which is complete in itself. Among its characteristics are a relaxed foot, 90-degree turnout of the legs, ornamental hand gestures, vertical carriage of the body, close interplay between music and movement, and the use of symmetrical, complex floor patterns in choreographies. The elements of this dance technique were common in both ballroom and theater dances.

Throughout the Baroque era, Paris was the center of the dance world, where ballets were produced which ranged in size from solo entrees to large group pieces. Casts were originally drawn from the most talented of the nobility at court, as well as from professionals trained at the Academie Royale, but after 1700 the casts became wholly professional.

The chief sources of notation are the collections of ballets published by Raoul-Auger Feuillet in 1700-1704 and Gaudrau in 1712. The notation system records the step units, floor patterns, and correlation between music and dance measures. Although a notation and description of the hand gestures exists, the dances are rarely notated with their corresponding hand gestures. Consequently, the reconstructor must choreograph these gestures into the dances. Theatrical dances which employ contrasts in dynamics and phrasing, and stylized gestures in the development of a character, call even more directly upon the reconstructor’s talents, both as a choreographer and dramatist.

On Baroque Opera-Ballet:

The production of Les Arts Florissants aims at realizing the original concept of the ultimate artistic synthesis where the combination of many art forms leads to a total sensual and intellectual experience. Baroque opera-ballet was music theater at its most complex, which drew upon the extant traditions of dramatic and musical improvisation, lyric poetry, stage machinery, and the various forms of music and dance composition. The existence of these cultural riches as a natural backdrop in this time of great artistic creativity produced an art of unequaled splendor whose “perfection” was surely what led composers such as Monteverdi, Lully, Rameau, and Handel to devote their lives and greatest energies to this form. It is our belief that Baroque opera, which was so irresistible to its original patrons and public, can be equally compelling for today’s audiences when it is presented on its own terms rather than in the mold of nineteenth-century grand opera. Baroque opera was immediately communicative to its original audiences, who lavished unheard-of rewards and praises on its greatest exponents.

The successful realization of this total art, the gesamtkunstwerk as it might be called today, requires a different kind of understanding than is currently prevalent in opera. When confronted with an immense work of da capo arias sung by mythological or historical characters, with many binary-form dances, modern musicians have often reacted with the same doubts Burney had in the late eighteenth century, assuming that the older form would of necessity be pedantic or boring. Actually the construction of an act of Baroque opera is a special process of composition balancing the two kinds of dramatic time, that of the recitative and the more suspended time of the aria and dance.

Charpentier’s genius lies in his outstanding ability to give a wholly satisfying suite of events, which exploit to the fullest the limited forces available to him. This genius can be best appreciated today by recreating the framework within which this creativity took place. It is this, not any abstract notion, which is the underlying reason to be concerned with “authenticity,” with hearing the whole work, and for restoring the dance and drama along with the music. A total effect grows from the consonance and resonance between the respective parts, the singing with the original instruments, the music with the dance, the dance with the acting and declamation, and finally the procession through theatrical time which allows a most interesting period and style of performance to come to life.

North Texas Giving Day 2016

Many thanks to Board President Michael Mathews for the matching funds, making this our best North Texas Giving Day ever!

The Dallas Bach Society board of directors also wants to thank the generous supporters of early music who donated today. With your help, we can fund the education and outreach endeavors of the 2016-17 season!

screen-shot-2016-09-22-at-10-26-53-pm

Baroque Bash 2 with Dallas Bach Society

The Dallas Bach Society, Texas’ premiere early music ensemble, is presenting a workshop on baroque performance practice. This FREE workshop is open to high school students enrolled in orchestra at Sam Houston High School. Students will work with world class faculty who are leaders in the early music field. Students will participate in large and small chamber ensembles, as well as masterclasses. A concert will be presented at the end of the workshop, open to the public.

Faculty: James Andrewes, baroque violin
Michelle Hanlon, baroque violin
Miguel Cantu IV, baroque viola
Eric Smith, baroque cello and bass

workshoparlington

Les Arts Florissants by Charpentier – 8 October

Marc-Antoine Charpentier’s renowned chamber opera Les Arts Florissants returns to Dallas after a 20 year hiatus, in collaboration with the New York Baroque Dance Company. Written to celebrate the return of peace to Europe (probably referring to the defeat of the Turks at the Gates of Vienna in 1683) this charming and profound work celebrates the return of the Arts of Music, Poetry, Painting, and Architecture, flourishing under the reign of Peace, who has triumphed over Discord, through the glory of the Sun King, Louis XIV. Tickets

 

Baroque Bash with the Dallas Bach Society

workshopdallas

The Dallas Bach Society, Texas’ premiere early music ensemble, is teaming up with the Dallas Symphony Orchestra’s Young Strings to present a baroque workshop. This FREE workshop is open to advanced middle and high school students currently in the Young Strings program. Students will work with world class faculty who are leaders in the early music field. Students will participate in large and small chamber ensembles, as well as masterclasses. A concert will be presented at the end of the workshop, open to the public.

 

When:
Saturday, Sept. 10, 2016 9:00am-3:30pm 3:30pm Concert

Where:
Meyerson Symphony Center Horchow Hall
2301 Flora St. Dallas. TX 75201

For more information on the Dallas Symphony Orchestra Young Strings, click here.

For information on the education and outreach opportunities of the Dallas Bach Society, call 682.325.2224.

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